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Aged Care Newsletter: September 2016

Newsletter 21 September 2016

In this issue:

In the 2015 – 2016 Budget the Federal Government announced significant reforms to the way in which home care is to be provided to elderly Australians, to be implemented over two stages, from February 2017 (Stage 1), and from July 2018 (Stage 2). This article asks the question 'Why Reform?' and looks at the legislative changes of the various planned stages. Read more....

Recently the Queensland Deputy State Coroner, John Lock, handed down his findings in an Inquest which included a recommendation given on the 'implementation of routine screening and assessment for elderly persons'. The findings have only recently been published, whether or not the Department of Health adopts this recommendation remains to be seen. Read more....

Individuals and organisations were given the opportunity to make submissions in relation to an inquiry by the Australian Law Reform Commission which is considering the existing Commonwealth laws and frameworks which safeguard older Australians from abuse. Read more....     

A Registered Nurse who was a director of a residential aged care facility has recently been found to have committed “professional misconduct” by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal regarding unauthorised dealings with a resident’s funds.The recent decision serves as a reminder to aged care providers to ensure that they have strong protections around any dealings with residents' financial affairs. Read more....

As an alternative to a Village Contract under the Retirement Villages Act 1999 (NSW) an operator may allow a unit to be occupied under a residential tenancy agreement in the form prescribed by the Residential Tenancies Act 2010 (NSW). This alternative can apply to an entire retirement village or a few units in an existing retirement village.The use of residential tenancy agreements as an alternative to the Retirement Villages Act has a number of potential advantages. Read more....

In a recent Supreme Court of Queensland Court of Appeal decision a nursing home employee was awarded more than $435,000 damages for psychiatric injury caused by workplace bullying. The trial judge found that her condition was caused by her consistently excessive workload and the conduct of a fellow employee, who was the manager of the nursing home. This article serves as a reminder to aged acre providers of an employer's duty of care. Read more....

 

Newsletter 21 September 2016
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